BRITAIN: This week in history 18-24 March

Queen-Elizabeth I portrait in the Padoga Room in Burghley Hall

This week has been a mournful one throughout history, with the passing of both the Virgin Queen and Britain’s first prime minister

Each week BRITAIN magazine will bring you a round-up of the significant historical dates in the week ahead; this week we look back at the death of Queen Elizabeth I and the ascension to the throne of Henry V.

Queen Elizabeth I as depicted in the portrait of her in the Padoga Room in Burghley
Queen Elizabeth I as depicted in the portrait of her in the Padoga Room in Burghley House

18 March

In 2014, 18 March marks the 700-year anniversary of the burning of Jacques de Molay, the last Grand Master of the Knights Templar. Historian and author, Dr Dominic Selwood, is now calling for a National De Molay Day to remember all of the armed forces, in memory of the discarded soldier.

In 1496 Mary Tudor, daughter of King Henry VII of England (and younger sister of Henry VIII) was born.

Robert Walpole, the first British premier, died on this day in 1745.

19 March

On this day in 1813 the explorer David Livingstone from Scotland was born. He explored Africa and was a well known abolitionist of the Slave Trade.

20 March

On 20 March 1616 Sir Walter Raleigh was released from Tower of London to embark on a mission to find the fabled city of El Dorado.

King Henry IV of England died on this day in 1413 and the following day his son Henry V ascends to the throne.

23 March

In 1657 France and England formed an alliance against Spain as part of the Anglo-Saxon War and Dunkirk and Mardyck were ceded to England.

24 March

In 1603 Queen Elizabeth I, the ‘Virgin Queen’ died and Scottish King James VI became King James I of England.

Related articles

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Britain: this week in history 11-17 March
Divorced, beheaded, survived…the wives of Henry VIII
Royal style

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