Top National Trust Father’s Day Walks

Birling Gap and the Seven Sisters, East Sussex. Credit: National Trust Images/Arnhel de Serra
Tiger Inn walk is located near Birling Gap and the Seven Sisters, East Sussex. Credit: National Trust Images/Arnhel de Serra

Looking for something a little more adventurous to do with your dad this Father’s Day? Why not take a stroll along one of these National Trust walks before a pit-stop at one of these fantastic pubs? Father’s Day sorted

Blickling Estate in Norfolk. Credit: National Trust Images/Fisheye Images
Bucks Arms walk passes Blickling Estate in Norfolk. Credit: National Trust Images/Fisheye Images

East of England: Wander Blickling Estate in Norfolk before a late lunch at the Bucks Arms

If you’re in Norfolk, why not plan a walk around the magnificent Blickling Estate parkland? The 4,500 acres of magnificent garden, historic park and ancient yew hedges are a delight to explore with an 18th-century Doric-style temple, secret tunnels and amazing birdlife. The 17th-century traditional pub and former coaching inn, Bucks Arms is located on the walk down from the main car park to the house. With locally sourced produce, seasonally rotating ales and a mean steamed steak and kidney pudding with horseradish mash on the menu, Dad will be in heaven.

George Inn in Lacock, Wiltshire. Credit: National Trust Images/Rupert Truman
George Inn in Lacock, Wiltshire. Credit: National Trust Images/Rupert Truman

South West England: Stroll the Lacock riverside walk in Wiltshire before a pint at The George Inn

Much of historic Lacock village in Wiltshire, dating back to medieval times, is managed by the National Trust. For a village-based day out with Dad, why not try one of the many National Trust walks around the area, including the village walk that takes in all the picturesque cottages and lovely English countryside; the riverside walk along the banks of the River Avon with views of the abbey and medieval village; or the Abbey pleasure garden walk through the forgotten water gardens. A stop at The George Inn after your amble is mandatory. Dating back to 1361 and featuring a huge open fireplace, the George Inn offers ploughman’s boards, sandwiches, hearty mains and delicious puddings.

Birling Gap and the Seven Sisters, East Sussex. Credit: National Trust Images/Arnhel de Serra
Tiger Inn walk is located near Birling Gap and the Seven Sisters, East Sussex. Credit: National Trust Images/Arnhel de Serra

South East England: Early start at The Tiger Inn before exploring the circular South Downs walk

Why not take Dad’s breath away with a walk to Birling Gap, part of the Seven Sisters chalk cliffs? Take an early lunch at The Tiger Inn (one that doesn’t hinder walking) and pick up a beermat with the circular route on it – this is one of six ‘Fancy a swift one beer mat’ walks in the South Downs. Starting from the pub walk to Birling Gap, taking in the spectacular views over the downs and East Sussex coast, before looping back again. The best part? You finish back at the Inn and, hopefully, just in time for some afternoon tea and a refreshing drink.

The Crown Bar, Belfast. Credit: National Trust Images/John Hammond
The Crown Bar, Belfast. Credit: National Trust Images/John Hammond

Northern Ireland: Explore the riverside trail at Minnowburn before heading city side to The Crown Bar, Belfast 

The Riverside Trail at Minnowburn is an an easy 2-hour walk that starts in the woodlands of Minnowburn and takes in the banks of the River Lagan. Post walk, why not visit one of Northern Ireland’s most famous pubs, The Crown Bar? This Victorian gem, dating back to 1826, and hidden in the streets of Belfast is a wonderfully atmospheric setting, with period gas lighting and cosy snugs that feature the original gun metal plates for striking matches and bells to alert staff.

Ty Coch Inn in the sheltered fishing hamlet on the Lleyn Peninsula, Wales. Credit: National Trust Images/Joe Cornish
Ty Coch Inn in the sheltered fishing hamlet on the Lleyn Peninsula, Wales. Credit: National Trust Images/Joe Cornish

Wales: Pit-stop at Tŷ Coch Inn along the Porthdinllaen walk 

Situated in the fishing village of Porthdinllaen on the north coast of the Llŷn Peninsula, Tŷ Coch Inn, meaning red house in English, is a spectacular spot to stop as you enjoy the Porthdinllaen walk along the coast. Be rewarded with magnificent views, fine sandy beaches, and the comings and goings of local fishermen, with a seat at The National Trust tenanted,Tŷ Coch Inn, which delivers wonderful seafood, refreshing beverages and lovely Welsh hospitality.

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