Poppies in Orkney mark the Battle of Jutland

Magnus Cathedral, orkney, poppies
Weeping Window, St Magnus Cathedral (2016) Image Credit: Michael Bowles © Getty Images

The Tower of London poppies arrive at Britain’s most northerly cathedral to mark the anniversary of the First World War Battle of Jutland.

Magnus Cathedral, orkney, poppies
Weeping Window, St Magnus Cathedral (2016) Image Credit: Michael Bowles © Getty Images

The wave of poppies that made up the Tower of London’s vast Blood Swept Lands and Sea of Red installation in 2014 have taken up residence in Britain’s most northerly cathedral.

The 888,246 ceramic poppies, each one commemorating a death in the British and colonial forces between 1914 and 1918, now spill dramatically from a small window at St Magnus Cathedral, Kirkwall, in Orkney in Scotland.

Weeping Window
Weeping Window, St Magnus Cathedral (2016) Image Credit: Michael Bowles © Getty Images

Due to the artwork’s remarkable popularity in London – more than five million people are believed to have seen the Tower installation – the poppies have been on tour as part of 14-18 NOW, a programme of arts experiences connecting people with the First World War.

The Weeping Window display in Orkney, which will remain in place until June, marks the Battle of Jutland, the biggest naval engagement of the First World War when more than 6,000 British personnel and 2,500 Germans died in the battle in the North Sea between May 31 and June 1, 1916.

Most of the British fleet sailed from Scapa Flow in Orkney to battle in horrendous conditions off the coast of Denmark’s Jutland peninsula.

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