King Arthur’s Cornwall: Tintagel and beyond

Tintagel
Tintagel Castle is located on the peninsula of Tintagel adjacent to the village of Tintagel. Credit: Rik Hamilton/Alamy

In the new issue, we explore the mythical landscape of Cornwall’s north coast and the legends of King Arthur at Tintagel. Here’s a pretty pictorial taste of what’s in store…

Tintagel
An evocative sculpture celebrates Tintagel’s long association with ancient kings. Credit: Emily Whitfield-Wicks Photography
Tintagel
Tintagel Castle is located on a peninsula. Credit: Rik Hamilton/Alamy
Tintagel
Tintagel Castle is associated with the legends surrounding the birth place of King Arthur. Credit: Getty Images/Lonely Planet Images
Tintagel Castle - Merlin's face carved into the rock, on the beach. Credit: Emily Whitfield-Wicks Photography
Merlin’s face carved into the rock, on the beach. Credit: Emily Whitfield-Wicks Photography

Tintagel

Tintagel Castle, said to be the place of Arthur’s magical conception. Set high on the rugged, windswept coast of North Cornwall, history and legend have become inextricably intertwined here, steeping the ancient site in a sense of mystery.

English Heritage owns the site today and there’s plenty to explore, from the ruins of the Dark Ages and medieval settlements, to Merlin’s Cave on the beach below. Thousands of people visit every summer alone and, in recent years, and investments have been made in enhancing the site, so its and even more evocative place to visit.

St Nectan's Glen, Cornwall.
St Nectan’s Glen, Cornwall. Credit: Getty Images
Located near Tintagel in North Cornwall, St Nectan's Glen and Waterfall are regarded as one of the top spiritual sites in the UK. Credit: natureslight/Alamy
Located near Tintagel in North Cornwall, St Nectan’s Glen and Waterfall are regarded as one of the top spiritual sites in the UK. Credit: natureslight/Alamy

St Nectan’s

A little further up the coast road is St Nectans Glen, an area of ancient woodland where a tranquil walk leads to a spectacular 60ft waterfall cascading through a hole in the slate ‘kieve’, or basin. It is said the Knights of the Round Table were blessed here before the quest for the Holy Grail.

For the full article see the Jan/Feb (UK) and March (US) issue of BRITAIN magazine.

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